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Exhibition

Diyan Achjadi
Shawn Hunt

Cultural Conflation

October 15, 2016 - December 31, 2016

Opening Reception: Friday, October 14, 2016

Curator: Nan Capogna

Vancouver artists Diyan Achjadi and Shawn Hunt explore art forms that have been appropriated from other cultures, often resulting in a conflation of sources. Achjadi examines colonial histories and migration through her prints and drawings derived from a multitude of references that include 18th- and 19th-century porcelain paintings, textile designs, medieval bestiaries, chinoiserie motifs, Javanese batik patterns, and fragments of Dutch maps.  By reordering these iconographic components in her meticulously made artworks Achjadi prompts a shifting of perspectives that encourage new readings of these multilayered works.  Included in the exhibition are Achjadi’s new and older multi-media drawings and collages, lithographic prints, printed “toile” on Tyvek, and animations that have not been exhibited in western Canada.

Shawn Hunt’s sculptural works draw from Western art history and combine with traditional Northwest Coast carved forms. The forms, carved primarily by Hunt, also include ones procured from his father, J. Bradley Hunt, a carver; they incorporate components such as model totem poles, canoes, masks, panels, feast dishes and tool handles. In these new constructions Hunt reimagines artworks from the canon of Western art, reclaiming a dissected First Nations history. With two exceptions, Hunt will present all new sculptural works for this exhibition. Achjadi’s drawings and prints and Hunt’s new constructions provide a rich fusion of cultures that call forward complex and sometimes contentious histories.

Achjadi holds a BFA from the Cooper Union School of Art in New York and a MFA from Concordia University in Montreal. She has exhibited widely at galleries and film festivals nationally and internationally. She is an Associate Professor of Visual Arts and Material Practice at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Born in Jakarta, Achjadi is of Indonesian and Canadian parentage; she grew up moving between Jakarta, Hong Kong, London, and Washington DC.

Shawn Hunt received a diploma in studio art from Capilano College and holds a BFA from the University of British Columbia where he majored in sculpture and drawing. Hunt comes from a family of artists; his father is Bradley Hunt, a prominent Heiltsuk artist with whom Shawn apprenticed for five years, learning wood and jewelry carving as well as traditional design. His most recent exhibition Line as Language was at Burrard Arts Foundation, Vancouver and he has exhibited nationally and internationally. Hunt is represented by the Macaulay & Co. Fine Art in Vancouver. He was born in Vancouver, BC and is of Heiltsuk, French and Scottish ancestry.

 

 

odalisque
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Above: Shawn Hunt, Odalisque, 2014 red cedar, yellow cedar, 50"l x 41"h x 21"w. Diyan Achjadi, Unfashioned Creature, Half Made Up, 2015, ink, gouache, acrylic on paper, 62” x 94”

Teachers Guide

Themes: 

Brochure
Dialogue with the Artists

Authors: Nan Capogna

To obtain a copy, please contact us.

Video

Artist Diyan Achjadi discusses the influences and ideas behind her work in the exhibition Cultural Conflation.

Cultural Conflation: Vancouver artists Diyan Achjadi and Shawn Hunt explore art forms that have been appropriated from other cultures, often resulting in a conflation of sources. Achjadi examines colonial histories and migration through her prints and drawings derived from a multitude of references that include 18th- and 19th-century porcelain paintings, textile designs, medieval bestiaries, chinoiserie motifs, Javanese batik patterns, and fragments of Dutch maps. By reordering these iconographic components in her meticulously made artworks Achjadi prompts a shifting of perspectives that encourage new readings of these multilayered works. Included in the exhibition are Achjadi’s new and older multi-media drawings and collages, lithographic prints, printed “toile” on Tyvek, and animations that have not been exhibited in western Canada.

Artist Shawn Hung discusses the influences and ideas behind his work in the exhibition Cultural Conflation.

Cultural Conflation: Vancouver artists Diyan Achjadi and Shawn Hunt explore art forms that have been appropriated from other cultures, often resulting in a conflation of sources. Shawn Hunt’s sculptural works draw from Western art history and combine with traditional Northwest Coast carved forms. The forms, carved primarily by Hunt, also include ones procured from his father, J. Bradley Hunt, a carver; they incorporate components such as model totem poles, canoes, masks, panels, feast dishes and tool handles. In these new constructions Hunt reimagines artworks from the canon of Western art, reclaiming a dissected First Nations history.